RECIPE REDUX: GRILLED PORK TENDERLOIN WITH BLUEBERRY AND GINGER GASTRIQUE

Summer is officially here. In Tampa, we don’t remember a time when the temperature was less than 80 degrees, but for the rest of the country, Sunday’s summer solstice marked the beginning of pool days and meals cooked on the grill. For the latter, we suggest replacing the frozen burgers with this easy (but complicated sounding) pork tenderloin recipe.

Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Blueberry and Ginger Gastrique
Gastrique is a fancy French term for “sweet and sour sauce”.
Serves 4

2 lbs pork tenderloin
½ cup champagne or white wine vinegar (NOT the distilled stuff – that’s only suitable for cleaning windows.)
½ cup beef or chicken stock (or water, if you don’t have any)
2 tbsp sugar
1 cup fresh blueberries
2 sprigs fresh tarragon
1 tsp freshly grated ginger
1 small shallot (sliced)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp canola oil

For the pork:

We’re going to assume that you have an already hot grill. Season the pork tenderloin well with salt and pepper and lightly oil the grill with some of the canola oil. Place the pork tenderloin on the hottest part of the grill and cook for 2-3 minutes per side, getting the outside nice and brown. Move the pork tenderloin to the cooler side of the grill and continue cooking for 10-12 minutes, until the internal temperature reaches 150 degrees. Remove the pork from the grill and let it rest for 5 minutes before you even think about touching it.

For the gastrique:

Place the shallot and the ginger in a sauté pan over medium heat with a bit of the canola oil; sauté for 2-3 minutes, until the shallot and ginger are really fragrant. Add the sugar and mix well. Continue cooking for another 2 minutes. Add the blueberries, tarragon, vinegar, and the stock and bring to a simmer. Continue to simmer until the liquid has reduced by ½, about 10-12 minutes. Strain the sauce through a mesh strainer to remove the chunky stuff, and season with salt and pepper.

Carve the pork tenderloin and serve the gastrique over, under, next to, or somewhere near the pork.